organ update

Every so often, I’ll go to different websites and read up on the recent literature on liver transplants and biliary atresia. Really, none of the information about biliary atresia changes, because it’s a pediatric disease (meaning, either you die as an infant, or you get a transplant as a child). There is very little research done on adult survivors of biliary atresia, especially those who still have their own livers (like me!).

Anyway, I came across this interesting website that lets you choose transplant centers based on state (most probably I’ll get my transplant done in Nebraska, but possibly at KU Med, if necessary). Then, you can see the demographics for the liver transplants the agency has registered, based on age, race, gender, and blood type. Additionally, you can see what the survival rates for that agency are for 1, 3, and 5 years after transplantation.

For example, at KU MED, in 2009 they have registered 3 organ transplants in the age range of 18-34 yrs, 3 with B blood type (which is what I have, B+), 18 females, and 0 Asians. The 1 year survival rate for transplants performed from 1999-2004 in the age range of 18-34 yrs is 84.4% (46 alive). The 3 year survival rate is 81.6% (74 alive), and the 5 year survival rate for the age range of 18-34 yrs is 86.8% (73 alive). This can also be broken down by race or gender. Pretty fascinating stuff, eh?

Ooh ooh! Now let’s do The Nebraska Medical Center. In 2009 they have registered 7 organ transplants in the age range of 18-34 yrs, 6 with B blood type (which is what I have, B+), 26 females, and 2 Asians. The 1 year survival rate for transplants performed from 1999-2004 in the age range of 18-34 yrs is 84.4% (46 alive). The 3 year survival rate is 81.6% (74 alive), and the 5 year survival rate for the age range of 18-34 yrs is 86.8% (73 alive). These are the same numbers as Kansas. I wonder if this means that Kansas and Nebraska are in the same region? Something good to find out, for sure.

You can do your own research at US Department of Health and Human Service’s Heath Resources and Service Administration Website: Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN).

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